Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Antemath (WOK Blog Entry #1: Words that are or should be.)

Antemath.  The state of being before an event, especially one of significance.  That which comes before the mowing.  A first-growth crop.

Late June, early July, a field of sunflowers.  The darkening glow of a summer afternoon.  A thousand golden faces tipped toward a retreating sun.  This was Sacramento.  A summer day.  A handful of moments rescued from a day otherwise filled with obligations and polite work-conscious chatter.  

I think of this field when I think of the word 'antemath.'

I think of grasses grown thick, the spongy feel of the morning beneath bare feet.  I think of split ends and the wild electricity of hair on a humid day.  I think of first dates, all that hope and expectation; fear.  I think of first-born sons, daughters, marriages, all the promises the world has to offer.  I think of a classroom, glue sticks and glitter, the day before the gunman enters.

I was in Sacramento today, attending yet another work meeting, traveling this time with a coworker, a friend.  I tried to articulate the wonder of that stolen moment, a field of sunflowers on an afternoon otherwise insignificant.  There were no words sufficient.  And the field long since culled for harvest.   



Blogger's Note:  Antemath is not a real word.  I wish it were.  It fits in my mouth and in my mind as if it were, folding itself around a concept I do not otherwise have a name for.  This is perhaps evidence that my vocabulary is lacking in some part.

Still, for the sake of the blog challenge, I have decided to focus my attention on words...words that are and words that should be.  'Antemath' is a should be word.


I was actually a little bit surprised to find out it wasn't a real word; less surprised to find I was not alone in using it.  Good words are good words, no matter what Webster says.

12 comments:

  1. I fully support your invention of antemath, but then again when you read my post you'll understand why.

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    1. I've been enjoying your blog very much...thanks for reading.

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  2. Good job, Anna! When I read the title, all I could think of was "before mathematics." (I CAN be very literal.)

    Loved this very visual paragraph: "I think of grasses grown thick, the spongy feel of the morning beneath bare feet. I think of split ends and the wild electricity of hair on a humid day. I think of first dates, all that hope and expectation; fear. I think of first-born sons, daughters, marriages, all the promises the world has to offer. I think of a classroom, glue sticks and glitter, the day before the gunman enters."
    Thanks, xoA

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    1. Before mathematics! I like it! Thanks for commenting! :-)

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  3. "I think of grasses grown thick, the spongy feel of the morning beneath bare feet. I think of split ends and the wild electricity of hair on a humid day."

    I could vividly picture and feel the field that you were describing. You did such a wonderful job taking your reader out from behind the computer and into what you were describing. Great post.

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  4. Treasuring the simple beauty that surrounds us is a gift; the juxtaposition to the innocence of a classroom before the gross violation of the gunman is jarring--and arresting. Perhaps your 'antemath" is the perfect term for those that too rarely, we embrace but briefly, like the sight of a butterfly carried off on a summer breeze.

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    1. I love your butterfly image! Thank you for reading. :-)

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  5. I love your word 'antemath'. It should be a word, after all it makes as much sense as yellow and sunflower.

    The imagery is beaustiful in this post: "A thousand golden faces tipped toward a retreating sun".

    I look forward to your list of words to come. Great post!

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  6. Creating words is one of my favorite hobbies. I'm a strong believer of if it sounds like a word and your audience understood it, then it's a word. I will spend the next month looking for examples of your words in my everyday life.

    The excited sleep before a trip to the zoo.

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    1. That's always the key...the audience must understand. Thanks for commenting. :-)

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